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20121129
20121207
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Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)
-abiding citizens. if he suggested stripping civil rights fromfully any other grimes large or small -- if you said black americans shouldn't be allowed to vote. you would be disciplined or fired tomorrow or later on this afternoon. it's an outrageous thinger to him to do. he's wrong that guns don't enhance safety. fbi's estimate is 750,000 times a year, 2,000 times a day law abiding citizens pull out a pistol and stop themselves from becoming a victim of crime. costas doesn't know what he's talking about. he suggested stripping me and millions of americans of our civil rights. >> there are so many things wrong with what he just said. he shouldn't be fired for expression an opinion. the idea that we live in a society that we can't express an opinion because of people's sensibility. and i never heard a rant. i just heard a person giving his opinion which i think is acceptable. bob costas has been around a long time. he's very respected. the idea that he would be fired over expressing an opinion over a tragedy is shocking. i'm not an anti-gun person. i group with guns. i group alaska. my taught for w
for support for artistic people that looked nothing like me. this is a civil rights issue. we all have to be included. host: we are talking about the federal response to the rise in optimism with ari ne'eman, the president and co-founder of the artistic self advocacy network -- autistic self advocacy network. our next call comes from florida. go ahead, please. are you there? go right ahead, please. caller: i need to know -- what do you do with a 20-year-old and a 22-year-old that was diagnosed -- has been on medication ever since they were about five years old, and they go from doctor to doctor, and when they take their medication, they look bleary eyed, and we have tried every kind of medication, but they cannot communicate, and the school that they were in -- have been in -- they have been in a group where some of the kids were so bad until they could not -- you cannot learn where there is so much confusion. you can sit down one-on-one with them, and they can pick up some things, and they can easily remember telephone numbers and things that are exciting -- they can remember that, bu
, or latino organizations, it's civil rights organizations, the labor movement, it's evangelicals, parts of the business community. there will be immigration reform in 2013 and the president will be forced to sign something that gets through congress whether he wants to or not. it's clear he does want to. >> it appears he wants to. the dream act, here we are in lame duck again, lame duck in 2010 was the great exciting moment for progressives. a thousand things that hadn't happened pineally happened. no particular conversation about another dream act again. >> let's keep in mind. i'm not as optimistic about the future of ledge indication as you. in the context of the immigration problem, immigration policy problem, let's say, in the united states, dreamers and the dream act is symbolic. it aekts a lot of people. it's symbolic in a universe where we have 10 million or 11 million or however many in the shadows. we have 141,000 visas a year. what the hell is that? >> it's that history, right? >> it is that history. >> it's bur okay tra advertised this kind of stuff. it's not a solution of ex
the international covenant of civil and political rights on express understanding that he was not self-executing. so it did not create applications enforceable in the federal court. the supreme court in the united states has told at the very standard applied in this treaty that is not self-executing means nobody has access to any quarter. there is no enforceable right to get anybody in america create in this treaty. the mac to enter the senator, i'm not aware of the specific british request and what response they drew. i would only say this. it's important, mr. president to understand whether distemper senator from massachusetts and i differ on most of these treaties, with the same disagreement on the law of the sea treaty. the question is in my opinion is their sovereignty of believe infringed upon our sovereignty and with that i yield the floor. >> mr. president, i yield five minutes. to the senator from illinois. >> by methinks senator kerry, senator mccain, senator lugar and so many others who have put this matter to the floor. it was 22 years ago when a historic event took place on the fourth u
intensely about it, where will put everything on the line to make it happen. in the civil rights era, when we had those celebrated filibusters, they were not partisan in the sense. they were factional. the fact is the filibuster's done by southern democratic senators to oppose civil rights or voting rights in a deflation were opposed by republicans, just as they were by non- southern democrats. the fact is that civil rights and legislation and overcoming this filibuster's and being enacted which at least as much to the credit and responsibility of everett dirksen, the minority leader, as to lyndon johnson. what we have seen is a regular use of the filibuster now as a partisan tool, and not just a group of members of the party, but the entire party has fashioned by the minority leader. the second is the use of the filibuster routinely, not on issues of great national significance, and not simply on those issues where the majority leader kills the amendment tree, but on issues and nominations which ultimately pass unanimously or near it unanimously. keep in mind on nominations, where holds w
was working with the house judiciary committee on getting that civil rights bill through, using the cardinal in philadelphia, using boss dick daley in chicago to try to get some members there. he was working, working, working. it is a job, politics. it's an honor and it's a job. you got to do it, and i think the president would learn from this fellow jack kennedy. as gamerrous as this guy was, he was a worker bee when it comes to politics and i think the more the president spends time with members of congress on the hill, the more liberal as well as the more conservative, the more personal sometime he spends with those people the better shot he has at establishing a working relationship. it's not done by the telephone. you go the to meet, you got to get in the same room together. >> words of wisdom. words from history. chris matthews, as ever. thank you so much. >> you're a great colleague, sir. >> thank you, sir. >>> next, why team romney and republicans still don't get it. stay with us. >> of what has happened to this country when i sing "white christmas" now, i will no doubt be deemed to
historic laws including the civil rights act of 1964. what a life. jack brooks, dead at 89. bill: 25 minutes past the hour. there could soon be a major shortage of primary care doctors. the journal of the medical american association says 22% of internal medicine residents are planning to become internal medicine doctors. what does this mean to you? marc siegl joins us now with the latest on this. doctor, nice to see you. >> good to see you. bill: what does it mean. >> i want to explain to our views out there exactly what an internal medicine doctor is. we always talk about primary care. primary care is a pediatrician, obstetrician, gynecologist for women's health, family practitioner or a general internist, which is what i am. someone who does the internal organs of the pwaopbd say body and says i'm not going to become a lung specialist, i'm going to stay as a general doctor. you're sick, you're having high blood pressure, high cholesterol, i'm the guy you see. people need doctors like that. without doctors like that what are we going to do? there was another study two years ago, th
have civil and human rights for all people. the progressive message we say that we should promote dialogue and diplomacy before we ever find ourselves in military conflicts. the progressive message is about an inclusive america. all colors, all cultures, all faiths. and an america that says if you -- if you live in this country and you want to work hard, the economy should be robust and broad enough and fair enough for you to make a good run in this economy. if you work 40 hours a week, you should be able to feed your family. shouldn't have to resort to public assistance. it's talking about having to stand up for the rights of labor, the rights of working men and women. the right to be able to be paid fairly. the right to be able to go to the doctor. the right to be able to look forward to a decent, fair retirement. the right to be able to see that your children will be able to get a good education that can see them through. in other words, the progressive message is the message of an inclusive america that makes sure that our economic and our environmental lives are strong, healt
to be the chair of the judiciary committee subcommittee on constitution and human rights and civil rights. we've had a series of hearings on the issues of human rights and laws in the united states that affect them. i've also been honored to join with senator cardin of maryland, who chairs our helsinki commission senate delegation on several trips overseas where he's made human rights a major part of the agenda of that commission and of the united states. that's why one of the aspects of this bill before us is so important. sadly today in russia, country of russia we are seeing evidence of brutal, horrific treatment of individuals and abuses of human rights. senator cardin, whom i said earlier is a great voice on human rights in the senate, introduced legislation in this congress that would impose u.s. visa bans and asset freezes on those who commit gross human rights violations around the world. that was the cardin amendment, which i thought was a good one. the idea was just sefrp. those who -- just simple. those who commit such acts shouldn't be allowed to visit our country. period. this ca
compliance with the legislation. laws such as the civil rights rs act, title 9, the family leave act strengthen our position. most importantly, i'm reminded of the veterans who have returned from the wars in iraq and afghanistan. the brave veterans who have served in all the places we have asked them to go, who have advanced the interests and ideals of the united states. we owe them a debt for their service. many of them have returned with severe wounds, some requiring lifetime care. and i'd like to just read a statement from one of the veterans that appeared in front of the foreign relations committee, a disabled attorney and veteran -- marine veteran john lancaster. and this is what he said. and i quote here. "in 1968 i arrived in vietnam in the tet ow offensive as an infay platoon commander. five months later i was shot and injured in a fire fight. after months of rehas been takers i arrived back home in western new york a disabled veteran. although my friends and family welcomed me home, society did not receive me quite as we will. while there is certainly tension around the poli
and that the message will be clear to those who are violating civil rights so horrendously. and i yield the floor. i suggest the absence of a quorum. the presiding officer: the clerk will call the roll. quorum call: quorum call: the presiding officer: without objection, so ordered. under the previous order, the questions on amendment numbered 3254 offered by the senator from new hampshire. amendment numbered 3245. excuse me. the senator from new hampshire. is there a sufficient second? there appears to be. the clerk will call the roll. vote: vote: vote: the presiding officer: are there any senators in chambers wishing to vote or wishing to change their vote? if not, the yeas are 54, the nays are 41. the amendment is agreed to. mr. reid reid: move to reconsid. the presiding officer: the majority leader. mr. reid: mr. president? mr. president, could we have order. the presiding officer: will the chamber please come to order. may we have orderment -- order. the majority leader. mr. reid: mr. president, we have one more vote t. will take -- start in just a few minutes. senator levin wants to say somethi
that many church-goers have changed their views about gay civil rights is one of the most underreported reasons why same-sex marriage is now legal in nine states. it is also one of the reasons that the constitution of prop 8 which took away gay californians right to marry. may get a hearing. the announcement was to be today. probably friday. a majority of main line protestants and roman catholics now favor legalizing same-sex marriage. did you know that? i knew a majority of americans. i did not know a majority of protestants and catholics favor marriage equality. >> that's awesome. >> stephanie: i was quite interested. >> thank you. >> stephanie: so when other more conservative christian kin claim it is against the bible we beg to differ. they wrote this in the "l.a. times," we posted this up on steph stephanie miller facebook. there are only three passages that deal with homosexuality in the new testament. the passages don't deal with homosexuality but with temple prostitution and other abuses. i'm
from demanding respect for civil and political rights." end quote. the cuban government should release all political prisoners. the cuban government should also release allen gross, the american who has been jailed for more than three years now for distributing telephones in cuba. as i understand it, he is in poor health and a humanitarian parole is more than justified. when we hear about the cuban government's policies toward its people, the repression of their basic freedoms, the persecution of political dissidents, it's understandable to want to punish the government and to weaken it so that it collapses. we have to ask ourselves if our goal is to punish the cuban government or instead to help the cuban people. our goal should be to help the cuban people. further, we have to ask ourselves whether continuing the embargo will accomplish that goal. in my view, the answer is clearly no. it defies belief and 50 years of historical evidence to think that continuing the embargo will result in the toppling of the castro regime. that regime has survived 50 years of sanctions. fidel castro is
our civil system. >> sean: are we or aren't we, though? >> i don't know, sean. that's the problem. >> sean: we had promises in the past that appear to be broken. >> right. >> and a setup report that says, oh, yeah we can hold these -- >> sean: this goes back -- >> they play by their own rules, sean. that's the problem. legally speaking they're finding a way to get around it and circumvent the rules to make it work based on the promises that they made prior to the election. that's what this is. i'm not surprised. they said they wanted to do this, tried to back off it, because it's controversial and improper. why would you, given the prison population, put these people in to create more domestic terrorists? >> sean: i think i know the answer. it seems to be rooted in man-caused disaster, overseas contingency, fort hood is workplace violent, and can't label benghazi a terrorist attack. there's a pattern of denial about what the threat is. >> now we can worry about how we're going to house these folks, but i'd like worry about how to find the mastermind who's been identified in every
conservatives will likely rebel. more "bill press" up after the break. we will be right back. exciting issue. from financial regulation, iran getting a nuclear bomb, civil war in syria, fraud on wall street, destruction of medicare and medicaid. there are real issues here. having been a governor, i know that trade-offs are tough. things everyday exploding around the world that leave no shortage for exciting conversations. i want our viewer to understand why things have happened. at the end of the show, you know what has happened, why its happened and more importantly, what's going to happen tomorrow. at cepacol we've heard people are going to extremes to relieve their sore throats. oh, okay, you don't need to do that. but i don't want any more of the usual lozenges and i want new cooling relief! ugh. how do you feel? now i'm cold. hmm. this is a better choice. new cepacol sensations cools instantly, and has an active ingredient that stays with you long after the lozenge is gone. ahhh. not just a sensation sensational relief. did you get chips for the party? nope. cheese plate? che
syndrome. 45 minutes after the hour. right back on "the stephanie miller show." >> oh, my! how ruthlessly absurd! >> announcer: it's "the stephanie miller show." exciting issue. from financial regulation, iran getting a nuclear bomb, civil war in syria, fraud on wall let's rock and roll. there is so much going on that every day presents another exciting issue. from financial regulation, iran getting a nuclear bomb, civil war in syria, fraud on wall street, destruction of medicare and medicaid. there are real issues here. having been a governor, i know that trade-offs are tough. things everyday exploding around the world that leave no shortage for exciting conversations. i want our viewer to understand why things have happened. at the end of the show, you know what has happened, why its happened and more importantly, what's going to happen tomorrow. get irresistibly clean and fresh carpets in your home with resolve deep clean powder. the moist powder removes three times more dirt than vacuuming alone while neutralizing odors for a clean you can see, smell and really enj
promote high standards of journalism and protect both the public interest and the rights and liberties of individuals. is it should set and enforce standards. hear individual complaints against its members, and provide a fair, quick, and inexpensive arbitration service to deal with civil law claims. the chair and the other members of the body must be dependent and appointed by a fair and open process. it must comprise a majority of members who are independent of the press. it should not include any serving editor or politician. that can be readily achieved by an appointments panel which could itself include a current editor, but with a substantial majority, demonstrably independent of the press, and of politicians. in the report, i explain who might be involved. although i make some recommendations in this area, it is absolutely not my role to think to establish a new press standards code or decide how an independent self-regulatory body would go about its business. as to a standards code, i recommend the development of an industry economy which could include serving editors. that comm
right, jill. thanks so much. jill dougherty there in brussels with the secretary. now, we are seeing new evidence today, meanwhile, of how turkey is being drawn into the civil war in neighboring syria or the potential. have a look at this. that's the view a little earlier from the turkish side of the border, as syrian war planes bombed not for the first time, the town that is literally just across the border that separates the two countries. ivan watson joining us now from istanbul, turkey. i know you have been there, and that attack obviously panicking civilians, many of whom have been crossing back and forth across the border. tell us what you have heard. >> that's right. our witnesses describing to us how the air strikes, at least two bombs dropped by syrian jets on this border town. it sent women, children, screaming in panic to the train tracks and the barbed wire fence that divides this border town in syria from the turkish town that's just about 100 yards away. it's really close and, of course, frightening people inside turkey as well. opposition activists we talked to say at leas
trafficing, women's rights, international terrorism, and more. no one nation can solve many of these problems alone. each one calls for a global network of partners -- government, businesses, international and regional organizations, academic institutions, civil society groups, even individuals, all working in concert. building those coalitions is one of the great task of american leadership. we rightly call america be indispensable nation because only the united states has the reach and resolve to rally disparate nations and peoples together to solve problems on a global scale. certainly in defense of our own interests, but also as a force for shared progress. our ability to connect is unparalleled. that, in the end, in the 21st century, is what leadership is about. diplomacy and development are not always glamorous. it is like what max weber said about politics -- the long, slow, drilling -- but it is the only way we'll be able to bring together the disparate and often conflicting interests to move forward in this interconnected world. here is one moment that captures this for me -- in dece
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)